Ink, Watercolor, Oil, & Acrylic

ink

Eilean Donan – Etching

Eilean Donan Etching web

copyright 2017 Mollie Bozarth

Leaving Edinburgh in June of 2016, we drove through the highlands towards Skye, stopping to visit 3 castles in 3 days along the way (Edinburgh Castle in the city, Sterling Castle south-west of the city, and Eilean Donan near the new bridge to Skye). Though rain had hit in Glencoe the night before, locals continued to express concerns of drought. For Scotland, I guess this means it rains periodically instead of every day. Lush green around us, with flourishing flowers, would seem to say that the land had seen plenty of water! But, I’ll admit that the fact that I could wander with my camera beneath the bridge at Eilean Donan confirmed lower amounts of rainfall than the area was used to seeing. Around 5 p.m. (according to my sketch journal), I walked a good ways out onto rocks beyond the castle and sat down with my sketchbook to draw. The panorama (in the photo montage below) was taken from that vantage point. It was interesting to see and sketch the castle from this less iconic angle. Just as I finished my sketch, large drops of water began to plop onto the page. Stowing away sketchbook and camera, I scrambled back over the rocks toward castle and proper land.

Eilean Donan montage web

As I’ve mentioned in other blog posts, Eilean Donan is one of the most photographed castles in Scotland. In fact, a photography contest was going on while we were there! People from all over the world had sent in their favorite and best shots of the place, seen from various angles, including from boats out on the water, or gorgeous sunrise shots with pinks glowing on the horizon, and nighttime shots with castle lit by star and lamp. These photos were posted all through the cafe where my parents and I ate lunch that day. Winners of the contest had been decided days before our arrival.

Fast-forward to present-day. I was prepping a new unit for my Drawing 2 class – drypoint etching, and decided my demo piece would be a good chance to pull out photos of the castle and try something new in the Scotland Series. Drypoint etching  is actually a technique I had never tried before, though I’ve heard plenty about it and seen samples of Albrecht Durer and James McNeill Whistler through the years. It’s a form of etching that doesn’t require acid. Instead, you use a metal scribe (looks like a sharp metal pencil) to scratch your marks into the plate surface. In Whistler or Durer’s times, copper plates were common to use. But, for cost-efficiency and ease of procurement, I picked up Plexiglas sheets from the hardware store and cut them down to size for my students. We actually started the process simply using nails (also from the hardware store), and sharpening them with sandpaper. For my etching, the side buildings and bushes to the left of the castle were all done with a nail. But, once we were a few days into the unit, I determined that it was worth the cost of ordering a class-set of traditional scribe tools. Boy, what a difference! You get much better control and cleaner/deeper marks with the scribe than with a nail.

Though this was my first etching, I’m pretty happy with the results! After a test-print, I tweaked minor areas, adding more hatch-marks, making some transitions more subtle. I’ve also begun to experiment with the inking and wiping process. In printmaking, you can change the look from one print to the next merely by adjusting the amount of ink you apply to (or wipe off of) certain areas of the plate. On my plate, there were bushes that tended to soak up too much ink. So, I’ve begun to wipe those more thoroughly before running it through the press. I’ve also been playing with leaving smudges of ink in the sky to accent clouds there. This is the type of thing Whistler would do with his prints as well, leaving sky or water virtually empty, but using a hint or smear of ink left on the plate to give subtle shading to those smooth surfaces. My kids are really enjoying this unit! They love getting to use the printing press (which looks like a metal dinosaur with a captain’s wheel to steer it). Perhaps I’ll get permission from a few of them to post results of their work on my blog. If you’re an art teacher reading this blog, I’ve been very happy with the Akua Intaglio inks and Akua tarlatan for wiping plates. The inks have an oily consistency but are soap and water washable, which makes for easier clean-up. Having tried drypoint etching, I’ll definitely keep using this method/media. There are several other shots from the Scotland trip that would translate well into printmaking. Now that I have a feel for using the scribe tool and creating shadows and texture with cross-hatching marks, I’ll work on improving depth, shading, and subtleties within the technique.

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Murray Tinkelman

Carol and Murray Tinkelman

Photo by Walt Engels ©2014

My grandparents have often talked about which of them will go first (pass away). They’ve given each other permission to die and honestly would be happiest if they died at the same time. When you’ve lived most of your life with the love of your life, it’s hard to be apart even for a short time. Murray Tinkelman said goodbye to his bride of nearly 60 years and knew that his job here on earth was done. He had run the race. He had lived a full life: enjoying children and grandchildren, a successful career, and the respect of colleagues and students world-wide. So, only two weeks after Carol’s death, I received news that Murray has also passed away.

Murray Ill web

Pen & Ink Illustrations by Murray Tinkelman

I wish my students could have met this man. His rough language (thanks to the army) and his tough persona (thanks to a stubborn disposition and a childhood in Brooklyn) could not hide his deep love for illustration, art history, his wife/family, and teaching. I mentioned in my last post how Carol kept the Illustration MFA program running smoothly. But the program would never have existed without Murray’s vision, knowledge, and contacts. For over 40 years, he’s been a highly respected illustrator. His work has been included in the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Brooklyn Museum, the New Britain Museum of American Art, and the Norman Rockwell Museum. In 2013 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame, joining artists such as Norman Rockwell, Winslow Homer, Maurice Sendak, and Charles Schulz. In 2014 the Norman Rockwell Museum honored him with its Artist Laureate Award and an exhibition of his work.

Murray’s first illustration was published in Seventeen Magazine. When asked about that illustration, Murray is quoted as saying: “It was awful! I was paid $10. You’re right if you assume I was grossly overpaid.”

That sense of humor – quick-witted, blunt, unvarnished, and extremely funny – is what I will miss most about the man. Murray planned to retire from his role as head of the University of Hartford Illustration MFA in June of 2016. Perhaps that is the only goal he failed to achieve. However, knowing Murray, I don’t think he would regret “dying with his boots on.” His job and his life were about people. The relationships we illustrators built during our years in the Hartford MFA reflect Murray and Carol: their genius, their teamwork, their understanding that artists can’t survive alone; we thrive in an atmosphere of collaboration and accountability. Murray and Carol created just that with their program. I am honored to say that I knew him and learned from him.

About the artwork:

Murray worked mostly in pen & ink, using Rapidograph pens in a hatching and cross-hatching technique. Being color blind never held him back and probably helped to develop his sense of value range and contrast. To hear Murray describe his technique and process, click here.

murray 1

Murray Tinkelman

* If you’d like to learn more about his life and work, check out the following sites:

Murray TinkelmanUniversity of HartfordFerris State University


Corolla Sketches

For years my mom has wanted to bring the entire family together for a week on the beach. Last week we finally pulled it off! Most of my siblings, nieces, nephews, Mom and Dad were there, sharing one of the huge beach houses in Corolla. Though we all live near each other, my siblings and I rarely get to spend extended time together other than at family weddings and funerals. We’re blessed to have a family that truly enjoys each other, works together, and are patient with each other. Living under one roof for a week can test that, but I think we all left Corolla with highlights and great memories. Personally, I loved being goofy with my brothers and sisters; playing Canasta and Settlers of Catan late into the night; playing billiards with my nephews; holding my baby niece as we splashed our toes in the pool and tossed rings for my nephew to dive down and fetch; a long drive to the airport with my sister and her oldest daughter, chatting along the way; an overload of Krispy Kreme donuts…my brothers and I not realizing that each of the others had already bought a box or two. One of my favorite memories is an early morning beach walk I took with my niece, Abby. While we walked, we combed the surf for shells. And I would pause to sketch while Abby searched the sands nearby. Today’s sketches are from that walk.

Corolla Beach Sketch 1The first is a gesture sketch of Abby picking up shells. A gesture is a quick sketch, done to capture the basic action of a figure. It’s a snapshot, not a detailed study. With Abby turning and stooping, standing then moving away, I only had a few seconds to study the lines, angles, basic shape of her movement. When teaching, I have my students start with a 3-5 minute study of the figure. Then we progress throughout the period, shortening allotted time for each pose, until we attempt one in 30 seconds near the end of class. It’s a fun exercise to try if you never have before! And, it’s a great way to train your eye/brain to process what you’re seeing then spit it out onto paper in a few lines.

Corolla Beach Sketch 2Fishermen line the beach, particularly in mornings and evenings, casting into the surf. When walking, watch out for the invisible lines! Don’t try to walk between the fishermen and their ocean or you may get tangled in a line with them cursing you in frustration. We knew better than to get in their way. I’d say standing in cool water, with the ocean breeze on your face, beats bobbing in a boat on the lake with stifling heat any fishing day.

Corolla Beach Sketch 3Stairways line the dunes – hundreds of them all alike. On a long walk, it’s easy to lose your bearings and struggle to find the staircase that leads back to your street! So, I studied ours, sketching the concrete wall and lines of sand fencing (not sure what you call it) that keep the dune sand from drifting when winds are high.

I often tell my students, “photos are great, but you really notice details when you take the time to sketch something.” Looking back at these sketches will remind me of our time in Corolla and the memories made there.


From the Sketch Journal

I’m currently in the middle of a couple of larger paintings, which will eventually be posted on the blog.  In the meantime, here are recent excerpts from my sketch journal.  The first was done in red crayon on our winter youth retreat.  The second and third are from a summer sailing day in Chicago.  Though I’ve seen and photographed Buckingham Fountain dozens of times in the past 24 years, many of the sculptural details went unnoticed until I took the time to study and sketch it.  If any of my drawing students are reading this blog, you’ll notice that the ballpoint pen shading is done with a hatching technique.  For those who don’t speak “art”: hatching is a series of strokes in one direction, used to create a range of values.  More marks, closer together, makes the shading darker.  The direction of a section of marks can help define various facets or planes within an object.

Ryan Sketch webBuck Fount 1 webBuck Fount 2 web


Face to Face

copyright 2014 Mollie Bozarth

copyright 2014 Mollie Bozarth


Above is a segment of this week’s Pick Your Portion artwork. The illustration is based on verses from 2 John, talking about our basic human need for fellowship…as well as our need as Christians to fellowship with other believers.

Artistically, I went to my favorite medium: ink with watercolor. This was a fast study, with no time for revisions. However, before I sat down at my art table, I laid out the design in my imagination, pacing basic sizes, space, lettering, before putting ink to page. I knew that I wanted a hand-written look to the lettering. I knew that “Face to Face” would be the focal point, and that the letters of each word would morph into details of the face/hair. I wanted to keep the faces simplified to a few lines…ink (not watercolor) would be the star of the show. In other words, I kept the watercolor washes basic so that they wouldn’t draw attention away from the ink line. In the written explanation on the PYP site, I talk about mentoring and accountability. So, I emphasized (slightly) the age difference of the two women chatting. For I feel we each have a lot to give younger generations, as well as a lot to learn from friends who are farther down the road of life/faith than we are. To see the full illustration, check out: http://pickyourportion.com/blog/ .


Sketches

c&c

This winter I’ve been working on a mural for our church.  Yesterday evening I finished touch-ups and officially signed it, so will take photos soon and upload them here.  Instead, today’s post will be a glimpse into my sketch journal.  Long ago (when I had the chance to travel in England) I began sketching during trips/vacations, rather than simply taking photos.  It’s a good exercise, forcing me to study the details of a scene and simplify them down to a few lines.  Looking back at these drawings later, I remember what I was doing, who I was with, what memories were being made that day.  Yesterday afternoon was a bus-ride with 34 middle-school kids, coming home from our winter retreat in Michigan.  As several of them honed in on a game of “Truth or Dare” (ah, the joys and predictability of middle-schoolers!) with their friends, I pulled out my journal and pen.  Interest in the game waned as the subject of boys and “who likes who” became theme, and the handful of kids surrounding me suddenly took interest in my sketches.  Elena offered to pose for me.  Capturing a quick likeness is tricky, especially with the added difficulty of drawing in pen on a bumpy highway!  Thankfully, Elena was patient.  While the lines, measurements, and symmetry aren’t perfect, I was pretty happy with the likeness.

elena

Flipping through my journal brought me back to several sketches from this summer’s travels.  Below are studies done during my trip to visit friends in Connecticut over July 4th.  The clock is actually an old time-stamp machine from a factory that my friend’s grandfather worked in.  The view of back steps was sketched while relaxing on their patio one evening.  And the airport sketch is a pretty typical scene…seems like today’s teens must be texting or entertained at all times!

flight

clock steps

 

 


Welcoming Spring

spring card web

The other day I hosted a watercolor workshop at my house…nothing fancy; just a time to hang out with friends and their daughters, and demonstrate a few watercolor basics with ink and washes.  This is the study I completed that afternoon.  I liked it well enough to turn it into a card!  It’s nice to simply sit down and paint for fun, without the pressure of a deadline or desire to please an art director.  The bird and blooms reminded me of this verse in Isaiah – one of my favorite verses because of the imagery it invokes!  Whether the very rocks of the mountains are crying out in praise, or the echo of birdsong trills through the hills, it captures the joyful essence of spring.  And, I can see trees in a field, their branches weighed down with blossoms, bobbing/swaying in a warm breeze…the rustle of applause as they dance for their Maker.

Happy Spring to you! May you go out in joy and be led forth in peace.